Table Mountain

Well I can report that the Hugh Masekela concert mentioned in my last blog proved to be a fantastic evening.  Africans do not need a second invitation to sing and dance and songs raised from traditional African, to spirituals and township Jazz.

On Saturday, I flew from Johannesburg down to Cape Town where I had two preaching engagements and a leaders meeting on the agenda.  Arriving early allowed me the afternoon to visit Table Mountain.  Time did not permit me to both climb and descend so I took the “easy” option of the cable car.  I had booked my ticket on line the day before and when I got there I wondered why I had.  The cables seem to rise near vertically 600m up the mountain side to a tiny cabin in an outcrop near the top of the mountain.  I nearly turned around there and then at the thought of the vertigo.

However, once in the car it proved to be remarkabley stable.  A turntable inside the cable car made sure you gained a 360 degree experience on the five minute journey to the top here.

The mountain is formed from limestone and contains rare flora and fauna not found anywhere else in the world.  There are remarkable views over Cape Town and the atlantic ocean fron the top of the mountain.  Unlike much of the rest of Africa there were far fewer hawkers and beggars.  Here I am with my head in the clouds!

One brave company had set up an abseiling route down the first 212m of the mountain..  Having not abseiled for 20 years I debated it for a few moments and decided this one was not for me.

I chose the Patteklip Gorge for my descent a 1:3 decline which included some hand scambles and walks through streams on the way down.  The advertised time for the descent was a 90 minutes.  I soon realized this must have been set by Yifter the Shifter the famous African Gold Medal Athlete on his famous Cable Mountain to Kilermanjaro two peaks challenge en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miruts_Yifter.

Three days later my legs are only just recovering from the three hours of continuous uneven rocky descent.  I felt for those people who had decided to climb its rocky face.

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